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Steven Copes
Violinist Steven Copes leads a diverse and enthusiastic musical life as soloist, chamber musician and orchestral leader. He joined the SPCO as Concertmaster in 1998, and since then has led the orchestra from the chair in several highly acclaimed, eclectic programs. He also appears frequently as soloist with the SPCO, performing concerti by Bach, Berg, Brahms, Hindemith, Kirchner, Korngold, Lutoslawski, Mendelssohn, Mozart, Piazzolla, Prokofiev, Schnittke and Weill. In addition, he has performed as soloist with the Philharmonia Orchestra of London, the Colorado Symphony, the Sao Paolo State Symphony, and The Knights. A zealous advocate of the music of today, he gave the world premiere of George Tsontakis' Grammy-nominated Violin Concerto No. 2 (2003), which won the 2005 Grawemeyer award and has been recorded for KOCH Records, and also gave the NY premiere of Lutoslawski's Subito (1992) for Violin and Piano. He has also performed John Novacek's Four Rags with the composer on NPR's Prairie Home Companion with Garrison Keillor. Recent solo engagements include the Korngold Violin Concerto with Rossen Milanov and the SPCO, Scott Yoo and the Festival Mozaic Orchestra, and the Berg Chamber Concerto with pianist Kirill Gerstein at the Santa Fe Chamber Music Festival.

An avid chamber musician, Copes has performed at festivals and concert series such as Aspen, Boston Chamber Music Society, Bridgehampton, Caramoor, Cartagena, Cello Plus, Chamber Music Northwest, Charlottesville, Colorado College, El Paso Pro Musica, Four Seasons, Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton, La Jolla Summerfest, Mainly Mozart, Marlboro, Moritzburg, Mozaic, Musical Masterworks, Norfolk, Piccolo Spoleto, Salt Bay Chamberfest, Santa Fe, Seattle Chamber Music Society, Skaneateles, Styriarte, Sweetwater Music Weekend, and at other festivals across the globe. He co-founded the Alpenglow Chamber Music Festival in Colorado as well as Accordo, a chamber music group in the Twin Cities, now in its 6th season.

A frequent guest Concertmaster, Copes has recorded and toured extensively throughout Europe and Asia with the Chamber Orchestra of Europe and the Mahler Chamber Orchestra and performed in the same capacity with the Baltimore Symphony, London Philharmonic, Pittsburgh Symphony, Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra, Royal Flemish Philharmonic, and the San Francisco Symphony. A dedicated teacher as well, he has taught and coached at the Banff Centre in Canada, New World Symphony in Miami, Colorado College Summer Festival, East Carolina University, University of South Carolina, (Columbia), National Orchestral Institute in Maryland, Western Michigan University, Indiana University, University of Minnesota, University of Texas (Austin) and Roosevelt University in Chicago. A native of Los Angeles, he holds degrees from The Curtis Institute and Juilliard, and his teachers include Robert Lipsett, Aaron Rosand, Robert Mann and Felix Galimir for chamber music. Copes performs on new violin by Brooklyn maker Samuel Zygmuntowicz, patterned after the 'Kreutzer' Stradivarius of 1727.



















'SPCO is back doing what it does best'
9/6/2013

After a summer of silence and a year-long lockout of the equally esteemed ensemble to its west, the Minnesota Orchestra, Friday night presented a powerful reminder of what first-rate performances of masterful music can do to stir your soul.

It was there in the exuberant yet meaty interpretation of the Bach suite and in the thrilling showmanship of concertmaster Steven Copes on the pseudo-violin concerto housed within Mozart's "Haffner" Serenade.

The half a "Haffner" the SPCO offered was a terrific showcase for not only Copes' musicianship, but for his playfulness, inserting snippets of other Mozart works into his cadenzas and employing the rough-edged abandon of a rural folk fiddler on the digitally demanding Rondo. It felt like Copes was asserting that orchestra concerts aren't just inspiring, but can be a lot of fun, too.Rob HubbardPioneer Press
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Published 10/27/2012

Old Lyme — This was not your father's chamber music program: No Brahms, Beethoven, Mozart, Haydn or Schubert. Not a whiff of Vienna hung in the air.

The concert opened with Bach's Trio Sonata from "The Musical Offering," one section of a unique, 50-minute contrapuntal exploration of a single theme, before concluding with the Ravel trio, a compressed, yet never rushed classic from 1914 that became an instant bedrock of the repertoire. In his introduction, Arron called the Bach "a true jigsaw puzzle" — it includes "riddle fugues" for the musicians to solve — but the riddles of themes and counter-themes were quickly solved when the ensemble of Arron, Park, flutist Tara Helen O'Connor and violinist Steven Copes exposed these elements like a revelation in the second movement allegro.

Martinu's gleefully Parisian and jazzy Sonata for Flute, Violin and Piano, with some wonderfully vocal duets by O'Connor and Copes and some fine blues from Park, set the stage for the Ravel trio.

From the opening measures of the Ravel, magic was in the air. The unhurried and ethereal piano theme by Park leading to the dry-eyed (and dry-bowed) beauties of the string unisons by Copes and Arron promised great pleasures that were delivered. Copes made his Masterworks debut, and his keen sensitivity to ensemble and glittering sound in the often vibrato-free passages make him a welcome addition to the Masterworks family.Milton MooreTheDay.com
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Nov. 20, 2012

The Mahler Chamber Orchestra, founded in 1997, has established a reputation as one of the finest chamber orchestras in the world. Their relatively small size was obvious here in Birmingham’s Symphony Hall, more often a host of much larger ensembles. The musicians were also clustered tightly around the piano, which was placed in the centre of the group and positioned so that the pianist’s back would be to the audience.

As we waited for the overture to begin, there was a sense of expectation that Andsnes might come on stage to conduct it. However, the orchestra suddenly began playing under the subtle yet authoritative direction of concertmaster Steven Copes. Clearly used to performing without a conductor, the ensemble was absolutely secure throughout the evening. The orchestra sported a lean yet cultured sound. Throughout, vibrato in the strings was used sparingly with woodwind lines lovingly played. In the dramatic overture, inspired by Heinrich von Collin’s tragedy Coriolan, punctuating chords were played with gunshot accents and precision. The scene was set for the Third Piano Concerto, composed in the same key of C minor, which featured at the end of this programme.Peter MarksBachtrack.com
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The opening subject of Beethoven’s Piano Concerto No.1 can sound Rococo, almost fey, in some hands, but even before it grew to its full strength here there was a muscularity to the Mahler Chamber Orchestra’s delivery (directed by Andsnes from the keyboard) that spoke of the strength to come, and threw down the gauntlet in the battle the concerto enacts between soloist and tutti. The woody mesh of tone created by the orchestra is perhaps their greatest strength – a carefully balanced texture through which a whole palette of colours can be refracted, as they later demonstrated so comprehensively in Stravinsky’s Apollo musagète.

Stravinsky’s ballet Apollo musagète offered a mid-concert showcase for the strings of Europe’s greatest overgrown youth orchestra, directed by Concertmaster Steven Copes. While outwardly much more conservative than the composer’s more familiar works for the Ballets Russes The Rite of Spring or The Firebird, Apollo merely pays lip-service to conformity, treating conventions of musical form and dance with a playful subversion.

Performed by the MCO the work’s bluesy, neoclassical textures emerged both charming and witty, alive from the block chords that herald the Prologue, through Copes’s characterful solo variation as Apollo himself, and on through Terpsichore’s deliciously drunken, wayward Viennese dance to the ecstatic close of the Apotheose.Alexandra CoghlanNew Statesman
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Performing as both conductor and soloist, Andsnes led his regular collaborators in Beethoven’s First and Third Piano Concertos, leaving them under the direction of Concertmaster Steven Copes for Stravinsky’s Apollo musagète. The recording sessions Andsnes and the orchestra have just completed have created a gelled, natural partnership that needs little from Andsnes apart from the occasional turn as traffic cop. The ensemble’s vivid energy is balanced by their control, and although characterful the opposition between soloist and tutti in the First Piano Concerto was never less than poised.

There was nothing polite about the Stravinsky however. Languorous and unashamedly ribald by turns, Stravinsky’s ballet score leapt into far-from-classical life in the strings of the MCO. While the variations found them witty and Copes’s own solo brought new gravitas to the deity, it was the ecstatic Apothéose that saw the orchestra at their finest. Bows dug deep into strings, reaching for for block chords that physically forced their way into the hall, knocking air out of you before suddenly releasing the bloom of their tone.

Alexandra CoghlanThe Arts Desk
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The Overture to Richard Strauss' final opera, "Capriccio," is a string sextet being performed for the opera's characters in the setting of an elegant salon. The chamber ensemble Accordo opened their third season with it on Monday evening, in their new home at Christ Church Lutheran in south Minneapolis. The setting might not be as plush as a salon, but it was certainly acoustically resplendent.

The clean, mid-century modernist architecture, by esteemed Finnish architect Eliel Saarinen, is on the National Historic Registry. The striking blending of light brick and blonde wood projects a bright sound of ringing clarity, but with enough reverberation to perfectly complement Strauss' grand Romantic score.

The quintet is made up of St. Paul Chamber Orchestra violinists Steven Copes and Ruggero Allifranchini, violist Maiya Papach and cellist Ronald Thomas, along with Minnesota Orchestra cellist Anthony Ross and guest artist Minnesota Orchestra violist Rebecca Albers. The six instrumentalists produced a rich, resonant sound, but were also capable of moments of refined delicacy.

The centerpiece of the program was Arnold Schoenberg's tone poem "Verklärte Nacht" ("Transfigured Night"). This late Romantic composition came before his conversion to 12-tone music.

Written in 1899, this is Schoenberg's Opus 4, a work of his youth. The poem on which it's based, by Richard Dahmer, is also a work of youthful sentimentality. In the first part, a woman confesses that the child she's carrying is not her lover's. In the second, he forgives her, and the night is transfigured. Though Schoenberg later disparaged the work's programmatic associations, the tone poem is very clear in its drama. Albers' viola gave plaintive voice to the woman's grief. And Copes effectively conveyed the transformative power of the lover's absolution. The intense melodies and complex chromatic harmonies created a passionate piece of musical storytelling.

The concert concluded with a rousing rendition of Tchaikovsky's "Souvenir de Florence." The title comes from the fact that he wrote one of the principal themes while visiting Italy, but the work is distinctly Russian-sounding in its use of folk melodies. Allifranchini took full advantage of the lead violin part.

Accordo's third season is off to a great start. With luck, Christ Church Lutheran will be it's home for many seasons to come.

William Randall BeardStar Tribune
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After a financial crisis at its home hall, the Southern Theater, left it homeless, this talented quintet of string players from the St. Paul Chamber Orchestra and Minnesota Orchestra likely saw dark days ahead. But then offers of help started pouring in: The Schubert Club wanted to present their concerts. And Northrop Auditorium's concerts and lectures department. And the Southern's onetime music maven, Kate Nordstrum, now with the SPCO.

And maybe most important of all: Minneapolis' Christ Church Lutheran, which asked if the group wanted to perform its concerts there. All of this good fortune came together Monday night for the opening of the group's three-concert spring season.

And a wonderful one it was, a performance bursting with electricity and urgency. Performing three works for string sextet, Accordo produced something far more intense and exciting than most would imagine chamber music could be.

Opening with the overture from Richard Strauss' last opera, "Capriccio," the sextet established a tone of romance and passion that held throughout the evening. Paradoxical tones of sadness and transcendence emerged on the

Strauss, and violinist Steven Copes and cellist Anthony Ross let the passion pour forth.

But the performance by which this concert will be remembered was an intense and emotionally evocative interpretation of Arnold Schoenberg's "Transfigured Night," in its original six-musician incarnation. In Accordo's hands, it became an inspiring journey from dark despair to shimmering triumph, full of drama and musicianship both precise and powerful. No operatic aria could convey such a sense of desperate longing.

And the concluding performance of Peter Tchaikovsky's "Souvenir de Florence" also reached a fever pitch of swoon-ready romanticism, the six musicians pouring their hearts into the interpretation.

Rob HubbardPioneer Press
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Ubiquitous in jazz and hip-hop, borrowing is scarcely less common in the music known as classical. For evidence, look no farther than this week's concerts by the St. Paul Chamber Orchestra, led by Rossen Milanov and featuring violinist Steven Copes, the orchestra's formidable concertmaster, as soloist.

The concerto, as the composer put it, was written "more for a Caruso than a Paganini" -- despite its fearsome technical demands, its essence is lyrical, not virtuosic. Copes, his tone gorgeous, his zest palpable, did full justice to both dimensions. He executed Korngold's bewitching "Romance," the piece's heart, with marvelous poignancy; its dissolving close was a full-body goose-bump moment. And by the end he'd found the sense of ease and spaciousness I'd missed at first.

Larry FuchsbergStar Tribune
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Korngold's Violin Concerto refracted the brightness into the Ordway interior with a warm and stirring performance that featured the orchestra's

concertmaster, Steven Copes, as soloist. Copes is a Los Angeles native, and he proved quite skilled at Hollywood heartstring tugging. Copes coaxed swooning reveries in the Romance before unleashing his inner folk fiddler on the fanciful Finale. He threw himself into the interpretation with theatricality worthy of an Oscar.

Rob HubbardPioneer Press
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I stood in my stall in rapture last night, listening to the most amazing interpretation I’ve ever heard of Brahms’ Op. 8, B Major Piano Trio at the closing concert of the Cartagena International Music Festival in Colombia.

I’m not sure I will ever hear it played in such a sensitive, viscerally connected, narratively taut, yet masterfully paced way again — by an ad hoc trio that fitted in scant rehearsal time between other concerts and giving masterclasses to young musicians.

The experience encapsulated the full, true, fragile, ephemeral attraction of the live concert. A live recording, as good as most are, can’t reproduce that special spark of the moment.

To paraphrase Lady Bracknell, live music is like a delicate, exotic fruit; record it, and the bloom is gone.

After the concert, all sorts of other paradoxes came floating up into consciousness.

I had travelled to the Southern Hemisphere to drool over a piece played by three people from the Northern Hemisphere (violinist Steven Copes, cellist Alicia Weilerstein and pianist Brian Ganz). I was in the New World listening to the quintessence of the Old World.

John TeraudsMusical Toronto
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BOSTON CHAMBER MUSIC SOCIETY: Tsontakis, Brahms, Fauré

Steven Copes, violin, Maiya Papach, viola, Benjamin Hochman, piano, Ronald Thomas, cello

August 27, 2011

This concert took place the night before Hurricane Irene was scheduled to come through. Nevertheless, the auditorium was quite full. They crowd came out to hear three works performed by the Boston Chamber Music Society: Knickknacks for Violin and Piano by George Tsontakis, Cello Sonata in E minor by Johannes Brahms, and Piano Quartet in C minor by Gabriel Fauré.

I wasn’t familiar with Tsontakis, just a little nervous about the piece from the title he’d chosen. I was prepared to hear an eclectic work, invoking a variety of styles from a wide variety of musical genres. And so it was. From the start of first movement, “Shufflling,” his arpeggios suggested minimalism; there were echoes of the late Beethoven string quartets; there was a cakewalk-like section; there were harmonies that reminded me of Philip Glass’s 5th string quartet. (You should listen to that quartet even if you are certain you dislike Glass.) I heard echoes of Bartok and Prokofiev. But altogether, the movement stood well by itself.

The other movements offered contrasts. “Goodnight Lullaby” gave us a short ostinato figure from the violin in its high register. There were more late Beethoven harmonies. “Fandango Facade” seemed to emanate from a late romantic spirit. Energetic performances of Steven Copes, violin, and Maiya Papach, Viola carried Tsontakis’ intentions with assurance. They seemed very collaborative and in sync with each other. At times, they had an almost uncanny ability to sound like an entire quartet, perhaps enhanced by the general liveliness of Pickman Hall. The following movement, “With Hushed Tenderness,” started with a wonderful conversation between violin and viola, a leading melody, followed by and answer, then sections where they doubled each other. The movement sometimes felt directionless as it moved along. For the final movement, “Bumpkinesque,” he returned to the Philip Glass-like harmonies in a highly rhythmic, dance-like, crisp performance. Ultimately, the piece was interesting, thought-provoking, accessible, certainly worthy of attention. I’d like to hear it again.Matt TempleFine Arts Reviews
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May 2, 2011: Leila Josefowicz & the SPCO at Mandel Hall

Schnittke’s Moz-Art à la Haydn for two violins and strings is a performance piece that needs to be seen to be fully experienced. But since the afternoon light was pouring in from the arched windows of the hall, the opening and closing sequences, intended to be played in complete darkness, didn’t quite come off. The musicians by default were forced to concentrate on the incongruous and witty music rather than the staging, which was just fine.

The piece, written in 1977, is a postmodern pastiche of styles and attitudes, with ample opportunity for the two soloists to glitter. Josefowicz and the equally virtuosic Steven Copes, the group’s concertmaster, played their parts admirably and the Alice-in-Wonderland sonic pile-up was brought off with great humor.Gerald FisherChicago Classical Review
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There is a part of the classical-music world that has for so long made a desperate attempt to cast off the art's perceived starchiness that the desperation has become as traditional as the starch. And then there is the Boston Chamber Music Society, which, like an enduring fine-dining monument, maintains old-fashioned ways at such a high level that one is reacquainted with their virtues.

Saturday's concert, the last of BCMS's summer series at Longy's Pickman Hall, followed a predictable programming pattern: a contemporary hors d'oeurve followed by entrees of 19th-century standards. The tuxedos were pressed, the applause was ritually withheld between movements. But formality doesn't always create distance, sometimes it collapses it; the thoughtfulness and accomplishment of the playing was consistently stimulating, even when a garnish or ingredient wasnԴ exactly to one's liking. It was enough to draw a healthy crowd, even in the face of an approaching hurricane.

Violinist Steven Copes and violist Maiya Papach presented the first course, selections from George Tsontakis's Knickknacks, a polystylistic anthology of short duos. The music tries out various roles - minimalist cheer in Shuffling, Latin drama in Fandango Facade - but most of the pieces revealed a core of sinuous, austere counterpoint. (Only Bumpkinesque, a fiddle-powered engine revving hard in second gear, defied the pattern.) Copes and Papach, fellow principals in the St. Paul Chamber Orchestra (where Copes premiered Tsontakis's Second Violin Concerto a few years ago), had ample flair to set off the more sober passages.

Ronald Thomas, BCMS's emeritus director, was joined by pianist Benjamin Hochman for the Opus 38 Cello Sonata of Johannes Brahms. It is a youthful piece, at least by the self-critical Brahms's standards. Thomas and Hochman seemed eager to connect the music to even earlier influences: Schumannesque lieder, Haydnesque lissomeness. Brahms was flexing his mastery of forms bequeathed by history - sonata, minuet, fugue - but the unhurried, slow-burn performance downplayed structural mass in favor of pointing out graceful outlines and details. Their sound contributed: Thomas's fine-drawn tone, gauzy and deep in the bass, wiry and buzzy up high; Hochman's classical lightness, gliding over the top of the keys rather than digging in. One might have wished for more gravity in the fugal Allegro finale, which instead came out preciously crisp.

But Hochman's persistent polish was perfect for Gabriel Fauré's Opus 15 Piano Quartet, another statement of grandly emotive youth, in which the piano's role is essentially iridescent; Copes, Papach, and Thomas spread rich, heavy cloth, which Hochman embroidered with silvery crewel. The Quartet's expansiveness demands architectural intelligence and heady perfume, and this reading delivered on both counts: high-powered conversation, intricately indulgent. To spend time in such old-school, refined company is a fleeting pleasure, but, then again, arenԴ they all? BCMS makes a welcome habit of maintaining timeless oases.Matthew GuarrieriBoston Globe

The rest of the program was sheer delight. Violinist Steven Copes and pianist Shai Wosner gave an electric, sometimes impish performance of Igor Stravinsky's Divertimento from 'The Fairy's Kiss,'a stripped-down version of ballet music drawn from Tchaikovsky. In the violin and piano arrangement, Stravinsky's own orchestration of Tchaikovsky's material is reduced to its essentials, lean textures skipping on lively rhythms, and Copes and Wosner made a fun, vividly colored story of it.

James McQuillenThe Oregonian

'A young artist whose playing was outstanding, technically, tonally, and stylistically.'

The Strad

Steven Copes interpreted Bach's a minor Sonata with an extraordinarily noble tone. He played seriously- in the best sense. With him, one feels that the music is simply in good hands.

Hannoversche Allgemeine Zeitung

They probably didn't expect to be wowed by the other piece on the program, Argentine tango master Astor Piazzolla's "The Four Seasons of Buenos Aires," given an adrenalin rush of a performance by violinist Steven Copes and the SPCO strings. But wowed they were, judging from the first 11 a.m. standing ovation in this regular concertgoer's memory. While the Vivaldi was also well played, the main event was upstaged by a work that drew upon it for inspiration. Actually, that wasn't what Piazzolla had in mind when he wrote "The Four Seasons of Buenos Aires." They were composed as separate pieces, each capturing the bustle, hum and dance rhythms of that Argentine port city. But Russian composer Leonid Desyatnikov arranged them into little violin concertos that drop in some of Vivaldi's themes as musical signposts. On Friday morning, the SPCO's concertmaster, Steven Copes, proved an electrifying soloist, unleashing breathtaking fire upon "Summer," becoming a bow-wielding percussionist on "Autumn" and "Spring" and making "Winter" a sweet, sad torch song with a singing melody. Throw in the fact that the whole SPCO string section was exceptional on the piece, and it set the Vivaldi up to be anticlimactic. And that's too bad, because violinist Ruggero Allifranchini played it quite well. It made for an enjoyable performance, but it didn't raise goose bumps like the Piazzolla.

Rob HubbardPioneer Press

Clearly unwilling to squander a visit to New York by performing as a backing band, the orchestra also played a short preconcert program devoted to Shostakovich's Chamber Symphony in F (Op. 73a, actually Rudolf Barshai's 1990 orchestration of the Third String Quartet). The arrangement works brilliantly. The passion of Shostakovich's 1946 meditation on World War II is magnified not only by the heftiness of the string textures but also by the broadened palette afforded by the winds and harp. The orchestra, led by its concertmaster, Steven Copes, produced a wonderfully focused, opulent sound.

Allan KozinnNew York Times

The Bartok Second Concerto was delivered by the American, Steven Copes, with flashing, often exhilarating vigour and a real sense of how the whole piece works and unfolds, not just its dazzling effects and grateful passages.

Financial Times, London

In one sense, the St. Paul Chamber Orchestra is venturing into uncharted territory this weekend with a program of works that have never been performed by this band.

But from an audience perspective, it's far from an uncharted voyage. Most of the program is very well-known: Debussy's "Prelude to the Afternoon of a Faun" and Schumann's Symphony No. 4. The centerpiece, Kurt Weill's Concerto for Violin and Winds, is less familiar, though it was presented just last spring by the Minnesota Orchestra with concertmaster Jorja Fleezanis as the soloist.

The concerto has an utterly different impact in this outing, which features concertmaster Steven Copes. Whereas the Minnesota Orchestra's presentation had a frenzied, explosive quality, the SPCO's performance is more refined and shaped — though it is still an exciting piece that involves wind instruments carrying knotty thematic passages while the soloist turns in a frequently dazzling display of spiky runs and double-stop figurations.

Weill wrote the concerto when he was just 24 and heavily under the influence of Schoenberg and Stravinsky. It displays a brilliant use of wind instruments and, especially in the SPCO's reading, a melding between soloist and ensemble that is muscular, vivid and complex. Weill might have considered "elegant" as a pejorative word, but that is the soaring quality of Copes' playing, along with the compelling sense that he's taking the listener somewhere.

David HawleyPioneer Press
The highlight of the concert was concertmaster Steven Copes' performance of the Violin Concerto by Kurt Weill.  The work demanded the full range of violin technique, from heartfelt emotion to extreme technical proficiency. Copes performed it all like the virtuoso that he is.
Under Boyd's leadership, the SPCO played the acerbic score with gusto, not softening any of the harsh edges and more importantly, providing an aural framework to showcase Copes' stunning performance.William Randall BeardStar Tribune

The Overture to Richard Strauss' final opera, "Capriccio," is a string sextet being performed for the opera's characters in the setting of an elegant salon. The chamber ensemble Accordo opened their third season with it on Monday evening, in their new home at Christ Church Lutheran in south Minneapolis. The setting might not be as plush as a salon, but it was certainly acoustically resplendent.

The clean, mid-century modernist architecture, by esteemed Finnish architect Eliel Saarinen, is on the National Historic Registry. The striking blending of light brick and blonde wood projects a bright sound of ringing clarity, but with enough reverberation to perfectly complement Strauss' grand Romantic score.

The quintet is made up of St. Paul Chamber Orchestra violinists Steven Copes and Ruggero Allifranchini, violist Maiya Papach and cellist Ronald Thomas, along with Minnesota Orchestra cellist Anthony Ross and guest artist Minnesota Orchestra violist Rebecca Albers. The six instrumentalists produced a rich, resonant sound, but were also capable of moments of refined delicacy.

The centerpiece of the program was Arnold Schoenberg's tone poem "Verklärte Nacht" ("Transfigured Night"). This late Romantic composition came before his conversion to 12-tone music.

Written in 1899, this is Schoenberg's Opus 4, a work of his youth. The poem on which it's based, by Richard Dahmer, is also a work of youthful sentimentality. In the first part, a woman confesses that the child she's carrying is not her lover's. In the second, he forgives her, and the night is transfigured. Though Schoenberg later disparaged the work's programmatic associations, the tone poem is very clear in its drama. Albers' viola gave plaintive voice to the woman's grief. And Copes effectively conveyed the transformative power of the lover's absolution. The intense melodies and complex chromatic harmonies created a passionate piece of musical storytelling.

The concert concluded with a rousing rendition of Tchaikovsky's "Souvenir de Florence." The title comes from the fact that he wrote one of the principal themes while visiting Italy, but the work is distinctly Russian-sounding in its use of folk melodies. Allifranchini took full advantage of the lead violin part.

William Randall BeardStar Tribune
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Conductor Boyd, who has made a splash heading the Manchester Camerata, projected the sublime beauty of Mozart's slow movements and, with excellent contributions from Pedja Muzijevic (piano) and Steven Copes (violin), led an arresting account of the Berg (Chamber Concerto), although the first movement, with its Viennese waltz, might have had more playfulness.

George LoomisFinancial Times

A Partita by Polish composer Witold Lutoslawski was commissioned by the SPCO for the Ordway's opening in January of 1985. Music director Pinchas Zukerman was the soloist then, a role assumed this weekend by the orchestra's concertmaster, Steven Copes. His deeply involving performance Friday morning reached its peak in the emotional middle movement, when his increasingly urgent high notes sounded like a cry above the martial fray of the orchestra.

Rob HubbardPioneer Press

The Chamber Orchestra of Europe under the baton of Thomas Ades created a magnificent performance on the fourth night of the Edinburgh International Festival.

In contrast to Ades' meticulous interpretation of Beethoven's Namensfeier overture, his baton wavered in the second piece of the program. Guiding the orchestra through the contrasting changes of character in Stravinsky's Pulcinella Suite, Ades' overall control and interpretation of tempi was not as strong as one would expect. Faltering slightly in the last Allegro entry before the Gavotta con due variazioni, the orchestra recovered quickly in response to Ades' assertive baton with a dazzling solo from leader Steven Copes.

Mary RobbMusicalCriticism.com

.. the musicians sank their teeth into this program as if voraciously hungry for the kind of emotional release afforded by Brahms, Mendelssohn and Schumann. None more so than concertmaster Steven Copes, the soloist for the Brahms Violin Concerto. He attacked the work with a passion and intensity rarely seen from a musician who more often comes off as a humble team player.

Whether shredding his bow hairs on the cadenza of the opening movement or tugging heartstrings on the slow Adagio, Copes was electrifying yet technically impeccable. Chalk it up to the fact that the SPCO had never performed this Romantic masterwork in the orchestra's 50-year history, but there was an atmosphere of seizing the opportunity that seemed to fuel this interpretation.

Rob HubbardPioneer Press

In a fully Romantic program of Brahms, Schumann and Mendelssohn, SPCO's own players show their virtuosity. Copes proved his mettle in the Violin Concerto in D, Op. 77 by Johannes Brahms. He conducted economically, with minimal hand gestures and often no more than a tilt of the head or a raised eyebrow, but he had a clear sense of the shape and structure of this monumental Romantic work. He was able to maintain his split focus without sacrificing any measure of his solo virtuosity and while maintaining a sure hand with the ensemble. As soloist, Copes demonstrated himself the master of the grand gesture, from the bravura cadenza in the opening Allegro to the lyrical meditation in the Andante. He clearly felt the music very deeply, and the solo performance was deeply affecting.

The concert opened with Robert Schumann's Overture, Scherzo and Finale, Op. 52. This brief three-movement work built from the sprightly, lyrical Overture to a lively and dramatic Finale. Copes clearly had a good time with the piece, leading an energetic, fast-paced performance that sacrificed nothing in terms of orchestral cohesion and balance.

William Randall BeardStar Tribune

The program ended with a dashing performance of Prokofiev's Violin Concerto No. 2. The music's mix of tart lyricism and incendiary bravura took splendidly to the suave brilliance and brawny attack of Steven Copes, the orchestra's proficient concertmaster.

John von RheinChicago Tribune

...the star of the show may have been the orchestra's concertmaster, Steven Copes, who delivered several thrilling violin solos on the concert's five other works. It was a briskly paced and utterly enjoyable program, full of reminders that the SPCO is a first-rate baroque band.

Or, in this case, a top-notch string section. For most of the concert, harpsichordist Layton James was the only one without a bow in his hand, and he and the cellists were alone in employing chairs. That increased the physicality factor, as the standing, conductor-less musicians cued one another with twists, dipped shoulders, nods and glances.

Allifranchini set an energetic tone on the Torelli concerto, stomping and swaying like a folk fiddler, and Copes soon followed suit on a Charles Avison Concerto Grosso. But Copes' strongest solos came on a set of 23 variations by Francesco Geminiani. All of the composers

represented were also violinists, and it's clear that they felt it in their best interests to write showpieces for that instrument.

Rob HubbardPioneer Press
The rapid about-face in the fortunes of chamber group Accordo reminds me of the final scene in the film "It's a Wonderful Life." Just as Jimmy Stewart's character, George Bailey, was in a dark and desperate place, only to be overwhelmed by the affection and generosity of the people of Bedford Falls, so has Accordo found its basket overflowing.

After a financial crisis at its home hall, the Southern Theater, left it homeless, this talented quintet of string players from the St. Paul Chamber Orchestra and Minnesota Orchestra likely saw dark days ahead. But then offers of help started pouring in: The Schubert Club wanted to present their concerts. And Northrop Auditorium's concerts and lectures department. And the Southern's onetime music maven, Kate Nordstrum, now with the SPCO.

And maybe most important of all: Minneapolis' Christ Church Lutheran, which asked if the group wanted to perform its concerts there. All of this good fortune came together Monday night for the opening of the group's three-concert spring season.

And a wonderful one it was, a performance bursting with electricity and urgency. Performing three works for string sextet, Accordo produced something far more intense and exciting than most would imagine chamber music could be.

Opening with the overture from Richard Strauss' last opera, "Capriccio," the sextet established a tone of romance and passion that held throughout the evening. Paradoxical tones of sadness and transcendence emerged on the

Strauss, and violinist Steven Copes and cellist Anthony Ross let the passion pour forth.
But the performance by which this concert will be remembered was an intense and emotionally evocative interpretation of Arnold Schoenberg's "Transfigured Night," in its original six-musician incarnation. In Accordo's hands, it became an inspiring journey from dark despair to shimmering triumph, full of drama and musicianship both precise and powerful. No operatic aria could convey such a sense of desperate longing.

And the concluding performance of Peter Tchaikovsky's "Souvenir de Florence" also reached a fever pitch of swoon-ready romanticism, the six musicians pouring their hearts into the interpretation.

And the 300-plus-seat Christ Church Lutheran proved acoustically impressive, with nary a trace of echo from the 35-foot-tall brick walls that surrounded the musicians. It seems a fine home for chamber music.Rob HubbardPioneer Press
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Upcoming Performances

December 8, 2014 -
Accordo
Christ Church Lutheran
Minneapolis, MN
with Kyu-Young Kim, violin; Maiya Papach, viola; Ron Thomas & Tony Ross, celli
Beethoven: String Trio in G Major, Op. 9 #3/
Schulhoff: Duo for Violin & Cello/
Glazunov: String Quintet, Op. 39

click here for more info
December 9, 2014 -
Accordo at Amsterdam
Amsterdam Bar & Hall
Saint Paul, MN
with Kyu-Young Kim, violin; Maiya Papach, viola; Ron Thomas & Tony Ross, celli

with Chuck Ullery, host

selections from:

Beethoven: String Trio in G Major, Op. 9 #3/
Schulhoff: Duo for Violin & Cello/
Glazunov: String Quintet, Op. 39

click here for more info
January 15-18, 2015
Mendelssohn Violin Concerto with the SPCO
Twin Cities
program also includes Prokofiev: Classical Symphony & Beethoven: Symphony #2
click here for more info
February 9-16, 2015
Performance Today: Winter Teaching Residency
Banff Arts Centre
Banff, CA
Program Director, Pedja Muzijevic
click here for more info
May 30, 2015 -
Mainly Mozart Spotlight Series
Auditorium at TSRI
La Jolla, CA
with Jon-Kimura Parker, piano; Alexander Kerr, violin; Jonathan Vinocour, viola; Efe Baltacigil, cello
Mozart: Adagio & Fugue in c minor for String Quartet, K. 546/
Beethoven: Quartet #4 in c minor, Op. 18/
Schumann: Piano Quintet in Eb, Op. 44

click here for more info
May 31, 2015 -
Mainly Mozart Spotlight Series
Fairbanks Ranch Country Club
La Jolla, CA
with Jon-Kimura Parker, piano; Alexander Kerr, violin; Jonathan Vinocour, viola; Efe Baltacigil, cello
Mozart: Adagio & Fugue in c minor for String Quartet, K. 546/
Beethoven: Quartet #4 in c minor, Op. 18/
Schumann: Piano Quintet in Eb, Op. 44

click here for more info
June 17-26, 2015
Colorado College Summer Music Festival
Colorado Springs, CO
with Susan Grace, piano; Scott Yoo, conductor
Berg: Chamber Concerto for Violin, Piano & 13 Winds
August 2-8, 2015
Curtis Institute of Music Summerfest
Philadelphia, PA
teaching and coaching

Past Performances

October 14, 2014
Accordo at Amsterdam
Amsterdam Bar & Hall
Saint Paul, MN
with Ruggero Allifranchini, violin; Maiya Papach, viola, Tony Ross, cello & Zach Cohen, double bass

Sam Bergman, host

selections from:

Haydn: Quartet in g minor, Op. 20 # 3/
Fred Lerdahl: Waltzes for Violin, Viola, Cello, & Bass (1981)/
Dvorak: Bass Quintet in G, Op. 77

click here for more info
October 13, 2014
Accordo plays Dvorak's Bass Quintet
Christ Church Lutheran
Minneapolis , MN
with Ruggero Allifranchini, violin; Maiya Papach, viola, Tony Ross, cello & Zach Cohen, double bass
Haydn: Quartet in g minor, Op. 20 # 3/
Fred Lerdahl: Waltzes for Violin, Viola, Cello, & Bass (1981)/
Dvorak: Bass Quintet in G, Op. 77

click here for more info
August 15, 2014
Salt Bay Chamberfest
Darrows Barn
Damariscotta, Maine
with Jennifer Frautschi, Serena Canin & Erin Keefe, violins; Dov Scheindlin & Beth Guterman, violas; Edward Arron and Wilhemina Smith, celli; Tim Cobb, bass

Eric Ruske, horn & John Bellemer, tenor

Britten: Serenade for Tenor, Horn & Strings
Mendelssohn: Octet for Strings in Eb

click here for more info
July 27, 2014
Festival Mozaic/ Chamber Music Series
Cuesta College Cultural & Performing Arts Center
San Luis Obispo, CA
with John Novacek, piano & Michelle Djokic, cello
Shostakovich: Piano Trio #2 in e minor, Op. 67
click here for more info
July 25, 2014
Festival Mozaic/ Notable Encounter
La Perla del Mar Chapel
Shell Beach, CA
with John Novacek, piano & Michelle Djokic. cello
Shostakovich: Piano Trio #2 in e minor, Op. 67
click here for more info
July 24, 2014
Festival Mozaic/ Chamber Music Series
Cuesta College Cultural & Performing Arts Center
San Luis Obispo,. CA
with Aurica Duca, violin; Ben Ullery, viola; Lynn Kabat, cello
Brahms: String Quartet #2 in a minor, Op. 51
click here for more info
July 15, 2014
Chamber Music Northwest/ Heroic Chamber Symphonies
Lincoln Performance Hall
Portland, OR
with Bella Hristova, violin; Fred Sherry, cello; David Shifrin, clarinet; Tara Helen O' Connor, flute, and many more!
Wagner: Siegfried Idyll for 13 players
Hindemith: Kammermusik #1, Op. 24
Prokofiev: Sonata for 2 Violins, Op. 56
Schoenberg: Chamber Symphony #1

click here for more info
July 14, 2014
Chamber Music Northwest/ Heroic Chamber Symphonies
Kaul Auditorium, Reed College
Portland, OR
with Bella Hristova, violin; Fred Sherry, cello; David Shifrin, clarinet; Tara Helen O' Connor, flute, and many more!
Wagner: Siegfried Idyll for 13 players
Hindemith: Kammermusik #1, Op. 24
Prokofiev: Sonata for 2 Violins, Op. 56
Schoenberg: Chamber Symphony #1

click here for more info
July 10
Chamber Music Northwest
Kaul Auditorium, Reed College
Portland, OR
with Sasha Cooke, mezzo soprano; Bella Hristova, violin; Paul Neubauer, viola; Anna Polonsky, piano; Dan Schlosberg, harpsichord; Samuel Suggs, double bass; Peter Wiley, cello
Bach: Cantata # 170, "Delightful rest, beloved pleasure of the soul"
Harbison: 'Crossroads' for Mezzo-Soprano, Oboe & String Quintet
Schubert: 'Trout' Quintet in A Major

click here for more info
June 28, 2014
Colorado College Summer Music Festival
Packard Hall
Colorado Springs, CO
Korngold: Suite for left hand piano and strings

with Toby Appel, violin; Bion Tsang, cello; John Novacek, piano

click here for more info
June 24, 2014
Colorado College Summer Music Festival
Packard Hall
Colorado Springs, CO
with Robert Walters, oboe; Scott Yoo, violin; Toby Appel, viola; Bion Tsang, cello; Susan Cahill, bass; Bil Jackson, clarinet; Susan Grace, piano, Mike thornton, horn
Harbison: Snow Country for Solo Oboe and String Quintet
Penderecki: Sextet for Piano, Violin, Viola, Cello, Horn & Clarinet

click here for more info
June 9-11
National Orchestral Institute (NOI)
Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center, U. of Maryland
College Park, MD
coaching & teaching
click here for more info
April 28, 2014
Accordo: Dvorak 'Dumky' Trio
Christ Church Lutheran
Minneapolis, MN
Mihae Lee, piano; , Ruggero Allifranchini & Kyu-Young Kim, violins; Rebecca Albers, viola; Tony Ross, cello
Schumann: Marchenbilder for Viola & Piano, Op. 113
Shostakovich: Piano Quintet in g minor, Op. 57
Dvorak: Piano Trio in e minor, Op. 90, 'Dumky'

click here for more info
March 29 & 30, 2014
Mainly Mozart Spotlight Series
La Jolla/Carlsbad/Rancho Santa Fe, CA
with Yura Lee, viola; Ronald Thomas, cello; Jeremy Kurtz, double bass; Anna Polonsky, piano
Schubert: Trout Quintet in A Major

program also includes:

Schubert: Arpeggione Sonata in a minor for Cello & Piano
Mozart: Adagio in b minor, K. 540 for solo piano

click here for more info
February 21-23, 2014
Mozart with Christian Zacharias at the SPÇO
Ordway Center for Perfoming Arts & Ted Mann Concert Hall
Twin Cities, MN
also on the program:

Hindemith: Herodiade
Ives: The Unanswered Question
Haydn: Symphony #93

Mozart: Piano Quartet in Eb, K. 493

with Christian Zacharias, piano; Maiya Papach, viola; Bion Tsang, cello

click here for more info
February 18, 2014
Accordo: Beethoven's 'Archduke' Trio
Christ Church Lutheran
Minneapolis, MN
with Alessio Bax, piano; Erin Keefe, violin; Becca Albers, viola; Ron Thomas, cello
Handel/Halvorsen: Passacaglia for Violin & Viola
Taneyev: Piano Quintet in g minor, Op. 30
Beethoven: Piano Trio in Bb Major, Op. 97, 'Archduke'

click here for more info
December 9, 2013
Accordo: Mozart & Mendelssohn
Christ Church Lutheran
Minneapolis, MN
with Julia Bogorad-Kogan, flute; Ruggero Allifranchini, violin; Maiya Papach & Rebecca Albers, violas; Anthony Ross, cello
Mozart: Flute Quartet in D Major
Debussy: Syrinx for Solo Flute
Francaix: String Trio
Mendelssohn: String Quintet in Bb Major, Op. 87

click here for more info
December 5, 6 & 7, 2013
Bach: Concerto in E Major with the SPCO
Neighborhood Series
program also includes:
Brandenburg Concerti #2 & 3
Orchestral Suite #1 in C

click here for more info
October 8, 2013
Accordo at Amsterdam
Amsterdam Bar & Hall
Saint Paul, MN
drinks, music, context & conversation, hosted by Classical MPR

with Erin Keefe, violin; Maiya Papach & Hsin-Yun Huang, violas; Ron Thomas, cello

selections from:

Mozart: String Quintet in g minor, K. 516
Brahms: String Quintet in G Major, Op. 111

click here for more info
October 7, 2013
Accordo: Viola Quintets
Christ Church Lutheran
Minneapolis, MN
with Erin Keefe, violin; Maiya Papach & Hsin-Yun Huang, violas; Ron Thomas, cello
Mozart: String Quintet in g minor, K. 516
Brahms: String Quintet in G Major, Op. 111

click here for more info
September 6, 7 & 8, 2013
Mozart 'Haffner' Serenade with SPCO
Ordway Center for Performing Arts
Saint Paul, MN
Edo de Waart, conductor
program also includes:
Bach: Orchestral Suite #4 in D
Beethoven: Symphony #5 in c

click here for more info
August 24, 2013
Boston Chamber Music Society
Arsenal Center for the Arts
Watertown, MA
with Mihae Lee, piano & Ronald Thomas, cello
Schubert: Piano Trio in Bb Major, D. 898
program also includes other works of Schubert, Vorisek & Lachner

click here for more info
August 4-11, 2013
Moritzburg Festival
Dresden, Germany
click here for more info
July 15-23, 2013
Festival Mozaic
San Luis Obispo, CA
Scott Yoo, Music Director
Bartok: String Quartet #6; Chausson: Concerto for Violin, Piano & String Quartet, solo violin
June 18 & 19, 2013
Reid Anderson's 'The Rough Mixes'
SPCO Center
St. Paul, MN
The Bad Plus' Reid Anderson's new composition on the new Liquid Music Series

with Jeff Ballard, drums; Sunmi Chang, violin; Tony Ross, cello

click here for more info
May 14-25, 2013
Tour with Mahler Chamber Orchestra & pianist Leif Ove Andsnes
Pavia, Lugano, Torino, Prague, Bergen
guest Concertmaster
Beethoven: Piano Concertos #2 & 4; Stravinsky: Concerto in Re & Octet
click here for more info
May 6, 2013
Accordo: Intimate Voices
Christ Church Lutheran
Minneapolis, MN
with Erin Keefe, violin; Becca Albers & Maiya Papach, violas; Ron Thomas, cello
Sibelius: String Quartet in d, Op. 56, 'Voces Intimae,' Kodaly: Duo for Violin & Cello, Op. 7, Dvorak: Viola Quintet in Eb, Op. 97
click here for more info
April 7, 2013
Mainly Mozart Spotlight Series
The Crosby Estates
Rancho Santa Fe, CA
with Arnaud Sussmann, violin; Richard O'Neill, viola; Efe Batacigil, cello; Alessio Bax, piano
Mozart: Violin Sonata in e minor, K. 304; Brahms: Piano Quintet in f minor, Op. 34
click here for more info
April 5, 2013
Mainly Mozart Spotlight Series
Auditorium at TSRI
La Jolla, CA
with Arnaud Sussmann, violin; Richard O'Neill, viola; Efe Batacigil, cello; Alessio Bax, piano
Mendelssohn: Piano Trio in c minor, Op. 66; Taneyev: Piano Quintet in g minor, Op. 30
click here for more info
March 24-April 1, 2013
Medillin Festicamera 2013; Scott Yoo, artistic director
Medillin, Colombia
with Mihae Lee, piano; Ronald Thomas & Michelle Djokic, celli; Ruggero Allifranchini & Jason Uyeyama, violins, Toby Appel & Juan Miguel Hernandez, violas; teaching and playing with talented kids from Youth Orchestra of Medillin's network of music schools
Franck: Piano Quintet & Dvorak: Viola Quintet
click here for more info
March 12-19, 2013
Mahler Chamber Orchestra tour with Mitsuko Uchida
Alicante, Barcelona, Bilbao, Lisbon, Madrid
guest Leader
Mozart: Piano Concertos #17 & 25; Bartok: Divertimento for Strings
click here for more info
February 25-March 1, 2013
New World Symphony
Miami, FL
teaching/coaching residency
February 4, 2013
Accordo: In the footsteps of Bach
Christ Church Lutheran
Minneapolis, MN
Kyu-Young Kim & Ruggero Allifranchini, violins; Maiya Papach & Becca Albers, violas; Pitnarry Shin & Tony Ross, celli
Bach/Mozart: Prelude & Fugue in d minor for String Trio, K. 404a, Hindemith: String Quartet #4, Op. 22, Brahms: Sextet in Bb, Op. 18
click here for more info
February 3, 2013
Accordo in Stillwater
Trinity Lutheran Church
Stillwater, MN
Kyu-Young Kim & Ruggero Allifranchini, violins; Maiya Papach & Becca Albers, violas; Pitnarry Shin & Tony Ross, celli
Bach/Mozart: Prelude & Fugue in d minor for String Trio, K. 404a, Hindemith: String Quartet #4, Op. 22, Brahms: Sextet in Bb, Op. 18
click here for more info
February 1-9, 2013
Curtis on Tour
Lake Wales, Sarasota and Ft. Myers, Florida
with Roberto Diaz, viola & Tessa Seymour, cello
Schubert: Trio in Bb Major, D. 581; Dohnanyi: Serenade in C Major, Op. 10; Beethoven: Trio in Eb Major, Op. 3
click here for more info
January 27, 2013
Curtis Alumni Concert in the Twin Cities
Colonial Church
Edina, MN
with Erin Keefe, violin; Tom Turner, viola; Eugena Chang,cello; Burt Hara, clarinet & Lydia Artymiw, piano
Mozart: Clarinet Quintet; Dvorak: Piano Quintet in A, Op. 81
click here for more info
December 9, 2012
Mahler Symphony #7 with Royal Flemish Philharmonic/ Edo de Waart, conductor
deSingel
Antwerp, Belgium
Guest Concertmaster
click here for more info
December 8, 2012
Mahler Symphony #7 with Royal Flemish Philharmonic/ Edo de Waart, conductor
Palais des Beaux-Arts
Brussels, Belgium
Guest Concertmaster
click here for more info
December 3, 2012
Accordo: A tribute to Debussy on his 150th
Christ Church Lutheran
Minneapolis, MN
with Ruggero Allifranchini, violin; Maiya Papach, viola, Ron Thomas, cello, and Benjamin Hochman, piano
Janacek: Sonata for Violin & Piano, Ravel: String Quartet in F, Debussy: Selected Preludes for Solo Piano, Faure: Piano Quartet in c minor, Op. 15
click here for more info
November 14-21, 2012
Mahler Chamber Orchestra CD release tour with pianist Leif Ove Andsnes
Reggio Emilia, Perugia, Italy; Cologne, Germany; St. Polton, Austria; Birmingham, England; Brussels,
guest Leader
Beethoven: Piano Concertos #1 & 3 & Stravinsky: Concerto in Re for Strings
click here for more info
November 4, 2012
UCSB Festival Chamber Music Series
UCSB Center for the Arts
Beaufort, SC
with Edward Arron, cello; Jeewon Park, piano & Tara Helen O'Connor, flute
Bach: Trio Sonata in c minor from Musical Offering; Martinu: Trio for Violin, Flute & Piano; Ravel: Piano Trio in a minor
click here for more info
November 1, 2012
Faculty, Family & Friends Concert Series
Sottile-Thompson Recital Hall, Ashley Hall
Charleston, SC
with Edward Arron, cello; Jeewon Park, piano & Tara Helen O'Connor, flute
Bach: Trio Sonata in c minor from Musical Offering; Martinu: Trio for Violin, Flute & Piano; Ravel: Piano Trio in a minor
click here for more info
October 30, 2012
Chamber Music on Main Series
Columbia Museum of Art
Columbia, SC
with Edward Arron, cello; Jeewon Park, piano & Tara Helen O'Connor, flute
Bach: Trio Sonata in c minor from Musical Offering; Martinu: Trio for Violin, Flute & Piano; Ravel: Piano Trio in a minor
click here for more info
October 27, 2012 & October 28th, 2012
Musical Masterworks Series
1st Congregational Church of Old Lyme
Old Lyme, CT
with Edward Arron, cello; Jeewon Park, piano & Tara Helen O'Connor, flute
Bach: Trio Sonata in c minor from Musical Offering; Martinu: Trio for Violin, Flute & Piano; Ravel: Piano Trio in a minor
click here for more info
October 17-21, 2012
Mahler Chamber Orchestra tour/ Dvorak with Daniel Harding & Steven Isserlis
Ferrara, Naples, and Turin, Italy
guest Leader
Dvorak: Cello Concertos #1 & 2, Symphony #9, 'New World'
click here for more info
October 15, 2012
Accordo: An evening in Austria-Hungary
Christ Church Lutheran
Minneapolis, MN
Kyu-Young Kim & Ruggero Allifranchini, violins; Becca Albers & Maiya Papach, violas; Tony Ross, cello
Haydn: String Quartet in G, Op. 77 #1, Bartok: Duos for Two Violins, Dohnanyi: Serenade in C for String Trio, Mozart: Viola Quintet in C Major, K. 515
click here for more info
October 2, 2012
FREE CONCERT by The Musicians of the SPCO and Garrison Keillor, Guest Host
Leonard Center Gymnasium, Macalester College
Saint Paul, MN
with Maiya Papach, solo viola
Rossini: Overture to The Italian Girl in Algiers, Mozart: Sinfonia Concertante in Eb, K. 364 for Violin & Viola, Beethoven: Symphony #1 in C Major
click here for more info
September 29, 2012
American Romantics with the SPCO
United Church of Christ (UCC)
St. Paul, MN
Walter Piston: Divertimento for 9 Instruments; John Harbison: Piano Quintet
click here for more info
September 28, 2012
American Romantics with the SPCO
Wayzata Community Church
Wayzata, MN
Walter Piston: Divertimento for 9 Instruments; John Harbison: Piano Quintet
click here for more info
August 24, 2012
Salt Bay Chamberfest
Darrows Barn, Round Top Farm
Damariscotta, ME
with Nokuthula Ngwenyama,viola; Edward Arron, cello; Romie de Guise-Langlois, clarinet; Conor Nelson, flute; Pedja Muzijevic, piano
Chausson: Piano Quartet, Op. 30; Sebastian Currier: Static; Roger Zare: World Premiere
click here for more info
August 11, 2012
Boston Chamber Music Society/ Debussy's 150th
Arsenal Center for the Arts
Watertown, MA
with Marcus Thompson, viola, Ronald Thomas, cello & Randall Hodgkinson, piano
Satie: Choses vues a droite et a gauche for Violin & Piano; Faure: Piano Quartet in g minor, Op. 45
click here for more info
August 10, 2012
Chestnut Hill Concerts/ Debussy's 150th
Katherine Hepburn Cultural Arts Center
Old Saybrook, CT
with Marcus Thompson, viola, Ronald Thomas, cello & Randall Hodgkinson, piano
Satie: Choses vues a droite et a gauche for Violin & Piano; Faure: Piano Quartet in g minor, Op. 45
click here for more info
July 30, 2012
Santa Fe Chamber Music Festival
St. Francis Auditorium
Santa Fe, NM
with Kirill Gerstein, piano & Oliver Knussen, conductor
Berg: Chamber Concerto for Violin, Piano & 13 Winds
click here for more info
July 29, 2012
Santa Fe Chamber Music Festival
St. Francis Auditorium
Santa Fe, NM
with Kirill Gerstein, piano & Oliver Knussen, conductor
Berg: Chamber Concerto for Violin, Piano & 13 Winds
click here for more info
July 22, 2012
Festival Mozaic
Cuesta College Cultural & Performing Arts Center
San Luis Obispo, CA
Scott Yoo, Music Director and conductor of the Festival Orchestra
Korngold: Violin Concerto in D, Op. 35
click here for more info
July 21, 2012
Festival Mozaic
Cuesta College Cultural & Performing Arts Center
San Luis Obispo, CA
with Serena McKinney, violin; Miguel Hernandez, viola; Lynn Kabat, cello
Ravel: String Quartet in F Major
click here for more info
July 10, 2012
Chamber Music Northwest
Catlin Gabel School
Portland, OR
with Gil Kalish, piano; Jennifer Frautschi, violin; Cynthia Phelps, viola; Ronald Thomas, cello
Schumann: Piano Quintet in Eb, Op. 44
click here for more info
July 9, 2012
Chamber Music Northwest
Kaul Auditorium, Reed College
Portland, OR
with Gil Kalish, piano; Jennifer Frautschi, violin; Cynthia Phelps, viola; Ronald Thomas, cello
Schumann: Piano Quintet in Eb, Op. 44
click here for more info
July 8, 2012
Chamber Music Northwest/Homage to Mozart
Lincoln Performance Hall
Portland, OR
with Ronald Thomas, cello; Gil Kalish, piano; Jennifer Frautschi, violin; Cynthia Phelps, viola; Curtis Daily, bass, John Cox & Eric Ruske, horns
Mozart: Piano Trio in E Major, K.542; Divertimento in D Major for Horns & Strings, K. 334
click here for more info
July 7, 2012
Chamber Music Northwest/Homage to Mozart
Kaul Auditorium, Reed College
Portland, OR
with Ronald Thomas, cello; Gil Kalish, piano; Jennifer Frautschi, violin; Cynthia Phelps, viola; Curtis Daily, bass, John Cox & Eric Ruske, horns
Mozart: Piano Trio in E Major, K.542; Divertimento in D Major for Horns & Strings, K. 334
click here for more info
July 3, 2012
Chamber Music Northwest
Caitlin Gabel School
Portland, OR
with Jennifer Frautschi, violin; Paul Neubauer, viola; Ronald Thomas & Mihai Marica, celli
Schubert: Quintet in C Major, Op. 163
click here for more info
July 2, 2012
Chamber Music Northwest
Kaul Auditorium, Reed College
Portland, OR
with Jennifer Frautschi, violin; Paul Neubauer, viola; Ronald Thomas & Mihai Marica, celli
Schubert: Quintet in C Major, Op. 163
click here for more info
May 12-26, 2012
Mahler Chamber Orchestra tour with pianist Leif Ove Andsnes
Brescia-Lugano-Turin-Bergamo-Prague-Dresden-Bergen
guest Leader
Beethoven: Piano Concertos #1 & 3; Stravinsky: Apollon Musagete
click here for more info
May 14, 2012
Accordo: Brahms/Haydn Variations
Christ Church Lutheran
Minneapolis, MN
Ruggero Allifranchini & Erin Keefe, violins; Maiya Papach, viola; Tony Ross, cello; Burt Hara, clarinet
Haydn: String Quartet in f minor, Op. 20 #5; Dahl: Concerto a Tre; Brahms: Clarinet Quintet in b minor, Op. 115
click here for more info
March 12, 2012
Accordo: Bacchanalia!
Christ Church Lutheran
Minneapolis, MN
with Ruggero Allifranchini, violin; Maiya Papach, viola; Edward Arron, cello; Ian Ding, percussion
Beethoven: G Major String Trio; Jeffery Cotton: Meditation, Rhapsody & Bacchanal for Violin & Percussion; Dvorak: String Quartet in C Major, Op. 61
click here for more info
March 10, 2012
Accordo at the Phipps Center
Phipps Center for the Arts
Hudson, WI
with Ruggero Allifranchini, violin; Maiya Papach, viola; Edward Arron, cello; Ian Ding, percussion
Beethoven: G Major String Trio; Jeffery Cotton: Meditation, Rhapsody & Bacchanal for Violin & Percussion; Dvorak: String Quartet in C, Major Op. 61
click here for more info
February 24-25, 2012
Korngold: Violin Concerto in D, Op. 35/ SPCO
Ordway Center
St. Paul, MN
Rossen Milanov, conductor
program also includes music by Prokofiev, Scarlatti & Shostakovich
click here for more info
February 6, 2012
Accordo: Romantic String Sextets
Christ Church Lutheran
Minneapolis, MN
with Ruggero Allifranchini, violin; Maiya Papach & Becca Albers, violas; Ron Thomas & Tony Ross, celli
Strauss: Capriccio; Schoenberg: Transfigured Night; Tchaikovsky: Souvenir de Florence
click here for more info
January 3-14, 2012
Cartagena Music Festival
Cartagena, Colombia
Stephen Prutsman, piano & artistic director; with Alisa Weilerstein, cello, Anne-Marie McDermott, piano, Brian Ganz, piano, Hsin-Yun Huang, viola, the St. Lawrence String Quartet and many more...
Bach a minor Violin Concerto, Mozart g minor and Mahler Piano Quartets, Brahms B Major Trio, Dvorak Viola Quintet in Eb and more!
click here for more info
Accordoa new chamber music group in the Twin Citieshttp://www.schubert.org/accordo/
The Saint Paul Chamber Orchestrahttp://www.thespco.org/
The Schubert Clubhttp://www.schubert.org
Chamber Orchestra of Europehttp://www.coeurope.org
Salt Bay Chamberfesthttp://www.saltbaychamberfest.org/
Chamber Music Northwest, PortlandDavid Shifrin, Artistic Directorhttp://www.cmnw.org
Festival Mozaic, San Luis Obispo, CAScott Yoo, Music Directorhttp://www.festivalmozaic.com
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Richard Strauss: Le bourgeois gentilhomme Suite, Op. 60 - Entrance and Dance of the Tailors

Chamber Orchestra of Europe

Vladimir Jurowski, conductor

Cité de la Musique, Paris

January 2009